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Jubilee Waxcap

Inedible Inedible
Autumn Autumn
Winter Winter

A rare and beautiful mushroom that should only be admired and photographed, never picked. It is a slimy, lilac/pink waxcap so easily identified and left in the field. I’m not sure of the edibility of this mushroom and as it is rare I have placed it in the inedible section.

Mushroom Type
Common Names Jubilee Waxcap
Scientific Name Gliophorus reginae
Synonyms Hygrocybe reginae
Season Start Aug
Season End Dec
Average Mushroom height (CM) 5
Average Cap width (CM) 4
Please note that each and every mushroom you come across may vary in appearance to these photos.

Cap

Pink/lilac to a violet/purple the cap is slimy and starts convex but will flatten out retaining an umbo.

Gills

Pink/pale grey and widely spaced with transverse ‘gills’ running between the main gills often visible. The gills, unlike the rest of the mushroom, are not slimy.

Stem

White to very pale pink stem that is slimy.

Flesh

The flesh is concolourous with the outside, the stem is usually hollow.

Habitat

In unimproved grassland like fields and pastures or graveyards.

Possible Confusion

The Pink Meadow Waxcap, pictured, but this is a pailer more delicate pink, the cap is more conical and it is a greasy feeling mushroom, not slimy like the Jubilee Waxcap..

Spore Print

White.

Frequency

Rare.

Other Facts

A rare mushroom that should not be picked but reported to the Lost and Found Fungi project at the Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew.
http://fungi.myspecies.info/content/lost-and-found-fungi-project?fbclid=IwAR2HBXTGDYzFICJgonCbaB1GfraUEIxU68Vfk14x14FwgvX6tbH4ypIfJg4
Waxcaps don’t like to be disturbed or sprayed so will be found where fields and woodland have been left alone.
It is now thought that waxcaps grow in association with mosses, before it was thought that waxcaps were saprophytic living on decaying organic matter.

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