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Wood Avens

Edible Edible Autumn Autumn Spring Spring Summer Summer Winter Winter

Very common anywhere shady and we can’t think of any woods or hedgerows that don’t have some growing somewhere.

Hedgerow Type
Common Names Wood Avens, Herb Bennet, Colewort, St Benedicts Herb
Scientific Name Geum urbanum
Season Start Jan
Season End Dec
Please note that each and every hedgerow item you come across may vary in appearance to these photos.

Leaves

A little like strawberry leaves growing in a rosette. The leaf stalk has a downy three lobed terminal leaf and then smaller single opposite leaves lessening in size towards the stem base.

Flowers

Five bright yellow petals flowering between May and August.

Seeds

The seeds are in the form of a burr which you have probably found attached to your trousers, socks and dog after a woodland walk.

Roots

A tangle of sturdy and fine roots.

Habitat

Most types of woodland, hedgerows and shady areas in fact almost anywhere.

Possible Confusion

A fairly distinctive plant, especially when flowering or in fruit.

Smell

The roots smell strongly of cloves but the mud must be removed first as mud has a strong smell.

Taste

The leaves have a neutral taste but the roots taste of cloves.

Frequency

Very Common.

Collecting

The leaves when young can be added to salads or stews or deep fried where they puff up a bit like prawn crackers.

The root is best picked, washed and dried as the clove taste grows in intensity after drying.

Medicinal Uses

Herbalists used to use it to treat poison, dog bites and liver disease, herbalists now use it for the treatment of gout, diarrhoea, heart disease and ulcers.

Other Facts

Used to mask the smell of clothes when people didn’t bathe as much and for detering moths.

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