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Mallow

Edible Edible Autumn Autumn Spring Spring Summer Summer

A very common weed that can grow up to a metre tall and be found on path edges, roadsides, hedgerows and even open woodland.

Hedgerow Type
Common Names Mallow, Round Dock
Scientific Name Malva sylvestris
Season Start Mar
Season End Oct
Please note that each and every hedgerow item you come across may vary in appearance to these photos.

Leaves

A five lobed pentagon shaped leaf that can be crinkly.

Flowers

A broad pink to lilac, slightly trumpet shaped flower that opens out to flat. Can be seen from May to September.

Fruit

The fruit are called ‘cheeses’ and resemble the shape of a full counter in Trivial Pursuits!

Habitat

Roadsides, path edges, light woodland, scrub, hedges and waste ground.

Possible Confusion

Geraniums have similar leaves but they have quite a distinctive, inedible smell, Mallow does not really have an odour; the flowers help differentiate between the two as well.

Taste

Neutral.

Frequency

Common.

Collecting

The young seed pods, called ‘cheeses’, can be collected and nibbled while out walking and have a nutty flavour.

The leaves need to be young for a salad, but not so for soups and stews, or they can be deep fried and puff up like prawn crackers.

The flowers can be used in salads where they will impart no flavour but add a bright splash of colour.

Immature seeds pods are often called ‘cheeses’ can be eaten raw as a nibble and have a pleasant nutty flavour. They can also be lightly steamed and served as a vegetable. Mallow cheeses can be steamed, lightly

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Common%20Mallow
Copyright © celtnet

Immature seeds pods are often called ‘cheeses’ can be eaten raw as a nibble and have a pleasant nutty flavour. They can also be lightly steamed and served as a vegetable. Mallow cheeses can be steamed, lightly

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Common%20Mallow

Copyright © celtnet

Immature seeds pods are often called ‘cheeses’ can be eaten raw as a nibble and have a pleasant nutty

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Common%20Mallow
Copyright © celtnet

Immature seeds pods are often called ‘cheeses’ can be eaten raw as a nibble and have a pleasant nutty

Read more at Celtnet: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Common%20Mallow
Copyright © celtnet

Medicinal Uses

Can be used as a laxative or as a poultice for external wounds.

Other Facts

Can be used as a yellow, cream or green dye.

Members of the Mallow family have a special fungal pathogen, called Mallow Rust (Puccinia malvacearum). The undersides of the leaves are dotted with the rusty orange-yellow coloured uredinia, (see picture). Uredinia are pustules which form from a mass of hyphae and spores of a rust fungus, which then rupture the host’s cuticle. Mallow Rust is a common fungal disease in the UK.

COMMENTS

7 comments for Mallow

  1. Diane De Halle says:

    Can you grow these in your garden?

    1. Eric Biggane says:

      Mallow grows easily and can be grown from seed for the garden.

  2. Yousef Nayef says:

    Good evening,
    I wonder if can buy some Mallow leaves and seeds from you?
    Can you please tell me what’s your full address and opening hours?
    Also the cost if I want to get it delivered.

    Kind regards,
    Yousef Nayef
    (Birmingham)

    1. Eric Biggane says:

      Hi Yousef, I don’t have any seeds but it is a common plant, so come early summer it should have started to flower and seed somewhere near you.

  3. slot77 says:

    buy some Mallow leaves and seeds from you? slot77
    Can you please tell me

    1. Eric Biggane says:

      We teach people how to identify plants and mushrooms, we don’t sell plants, mushrooms or seeds. If you use our guide, you should be able to find and identify mallow, it is a very common plant.

  4. Peter says:

    Is it common for the stems to have “splatter” markings, similar to hemlock? I found some today, growing alongside hemlock, and it had the same patterning on the stem, but not to the same extent (it was definitely the mallow stem, as I checked, and it was hairy). I found more with the same pattern, but not growing with hemlock. And then more again, but this time without the patterning. I was just wondering what the chances of it hybridising are.

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