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Wild Mustard

Edible Edible Spring Spring Summer Summer

A large plant can yield tens of thousands of seeds but other varieties have been chosen for use by the makers of mustard.

Hedgerow Type
Common Names Wild Mustard, Charlock, Field Mustard
Scientific Name Sinapis arvensis
Season Start Mar
Season End Aug
Please note that each and every hedgerow item you come across may vary in appearance to these photos.

Leaves

The leaves look very different from the young to the mature plant and also look different where they are on the individual plant. The lower leaves have a stem, the upper leaves are joined directly to the main stem but all the leaves have hairs on them, are mainly lobed and have serrated edges.

Flowers

Like all the Brassicas, Charlock has cruciforme flowers (four petals in a cross) that are yellow and grow in clusters on the ends of  the branching flower stems.

Stem

Tall and erect or can be very branched and lower, sometimes with purple colouring at the leaf and branch nodes.

Habitat

Field edges, roadsides, gardens, waste ground and cultivated ground usually in sunny places.

Possible Confusion

Other Brassicas, mainly mustards and rape.
Can look a little like Ragwort, pictured, but the smell of mustard should keep you safe.

Smell

When crushed the leaves smell strongly of mustard.

Taste

Sweet mustard.

Frequency

Occasional.

Collecting

The younger leaves can be added to salads, the older leaves cooked as a green.

The flowers can be added to salads.

The seeds when dried and ground can be mixed with water or vinegar to make a good mustard or sprouted for a healthy salad..

Medicinal Uses

Mustard is good for stimulating the appetite.

Said to be good for the treatment of melancholy or depression.

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