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Beefsteak Fungus


Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus, Fistulina hepatica
A young Fistulina hepatica
A young Fistulina hepatica
Beefsteak Fungus sliced showing its steak like qualities
Beefsteak Fungus sliced showing its steak like qualities
Beefteak Fungus often grow in small groups like these.
Beefteak Fungus often grow in small groups like these.
A perfect pair of beefsteak fungus, Fistulina hepatica
A perfect pair of beefsteak fungus, Fistulina hepatica
These examples show how it got it's other common name, the Ox Tongue fungus.
These examples show how it got it's other common name, the Ox Tongue fungus.
A Beefsteak fungus looking very much like an old piece of meat.
A Beefsteak fungus looking very much like an old piece of meat.
Young Beefsteak Fungus grow as small red nodules on Oak Trees
Young Beefsteak Fungus grow as small red nodules on Oak Trees


Mushroom Type Edible
   
Common Name 2 Ox-tongue fungus
Latin Name Fistulina hepatica
   
Season Start August
Season End November
   
Maximum height (CM) 0
Maximum width (CM) 20
   
Smell Pleasant.
Gills No gills. Off-white to cream tiny round pores or tubules which bruise red/brown.
Spore Print Pink/pale ochre. Ovate.
Stem Concolourous with the cap, lateral, short and thick if present.
Cap Tongue shaped semicircular bracket with an inflated edge when young flatteningwith age. Red or red/pink/brown. Usually moist or sticky.
Flesh Red with white 'veins' very much resembling raw meat. Exudes a blood like liquid in drops.
Habitat Growing on living or dead oak and sweet chestnut.
Taste Good but slightly acidic or sour getting stronger with age. Good as a meat substitute as it looks like the real thing.
Possible Confusion You are unlikely to confuse this species with anything else.
Description Common. This mushroom is best cooked in a creamy recipe or mixed with other mushrooms due to the slight acid taste. The wood of trees infected with the beefsteak fungus develop brown rot which makes the wood richer, darker and of great interest to the furniture building trade.